Denise Caron-Quinn is now an Evernote Certified Consultant

Evernote is a remarkable productivity tool that offers cloud-based storage, flexibility, and multi-platform support. We’re pleased to announce that In Order to Succeed Founder, Denise Caron-Quinn, has become an Evernote Certified Consultant. Having completed the comprehensive Evernote Business training, Denise is recognized as an Evernote expert. She can help show clients how to quickly get Evernote Business set up for their team and guide them towards maximum productivity.

Benefits of Working with an Evernote Certified Consultant:

Custom-designed workflows tailored to meet your needs
Guidance on how to best deploy Evernote in your business
In-person assistance to ensure fast adoption of Evernote among your team
Access to a personal go-to expert when you have questions
From small tasks to major projects, Evernote is where you’ll achieve your best work, day in and day out. As one workspace that lives across your phone, tablet, and computer, Evernote is the most productive office for modern teams.

Getting Started with Evernote

Interested in trying Evernote?

Sign up for an Evernote account and get one month of Evernote Premium for free

Contact us to get started using Evernote for you or your team.

Denise is looking forward to attending the Evernote Conference: EC4. Please join her and use code EB25 for 25% off registration fee.
Evernote Business Certified Consultants

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5 Reasons Your Business Should Hire a Professional Organizer

18455_5302Professional organizers help clients decrease stress, regain control of time and space, improve the functionality and appearance of their office, enhance efficiency, boost productivity and help simplify lives, but you didn’t here it from us. Here are 5 reasons your business should hire a professional organizer, spoken by 5 people who did:

Stacks of various paperwork were scattered throughout my home office, and it became beyond burdensome. My family members and patients alike were dismayed to see the disarray. I knew something had to be done, but my tight family and work schedule allowed little time to do so. When I found In Order To Succeed®, I was more than happy to leave it to them to create order out of my chaotic situation. The results were dramatic! Denise immediately understood my working style and designed a plan to specifically fit my needs. She systematically eliminated the chaos and developed a system of filing and organization that is efficient and easy for me to use. And, anyone else who comes in to assist me finds the system seamless as well. I was worried that the vast amount of paperwork and clutter in my office would be too daunting, but Denise tackled the barrage head on, and then showed me ways to keep my office neat, organized and smooth- running from now on! I am forever grateful for her help. I cannot stress enough how much time and money In Order To Succeed® has saved me. My office is now a well-oiled machine! GR, Physician, Hoboken NJ

We hired In Order To Succeed® for a project of conducting much needed research. Our firm needed to determine whether to launch a new product our medical center had been considering for quite a long time. Our problem had been that we did not have the time or resources to take the first step. In Order To Succeed® managed to gather all the data necessary, both quickly and accurately, which helped us to make the decision to take next steps for new product development. In Order To Succeed® enabled us to get the ball rolling on an initiative that has been well received by our clientele, and profitable to our Center. In retrospect, we wish we had made the decision to hire In Order To Succeed® years ago. Major Medical Center, NY, NY

Nina, working with you was such a pleasure. I had been procrastinating about organizing my office. It just seemed like it was too much to do. Especially so, when I considered my large, time consuming regular work schedule. You made it easy, efficient and fun. Before I organized my workspace with your help, I had papers and magazines everywhere. I could never find anything and did not have a good paper flow. I had supplies in several different areas and I was constantly getting up from my desk, consistently disrupting my work. Now, I have organized files – both electronic and paper; and, my desk is clean and no longer cluttered. I’m so much more efficient. I no longer must get up from my desk all the time. SH Interior Designer, Fairfield CT

If you are starting a new phase in your personal life or business practice, I highly recommend utilizing Denise and her team of professional organizers. She helped me evaluate what was working and what was not working in my practice. She helped me develop a plan that I could achieve, and she kept me accountable for accomplishing the changes. Because she understands business processes and has a strong handle on what enhances professional effectiveness, she helped me go to the next level. If your hesitation is about giving up time out of your already crammed schedule that is all the more reason to hire her – with a little help from Denise in the time management arena you will have MORE time, not less. CC, Marketing Consultant, New Canaan, CT

I really benefit from knowing that our convenient weekly phone call is scheduled as a “standing meeting,” and that I’ll come out of the discussion with very concrete and customized goals for the coming week that suit MY specific needs. Denise keeps me accountable for making real progress each week. She’ll stay on top of me and always offers fresh ideas and sound advice. I never knew how much more I could accomplish by being more focused and organized. ASC, Advertising Executive, NY, NY

Further Reading
Learn more about In Order to Succeed’s Business Organizing Solutions
Image Courtesy of Adam Saponara


What Makes Us Unique? From Denise Caron-Quinn

In Order to Succeed‘s President and Founder, Denise Caron-Quinn dicusses what makes the company unique

Watch the video:

Further Reading
To learn more about In Order to Succeed visit us at www.inordertosucceed.com
Watch more In Order to Succeed weblogs on the company’s youtube channel.

What is In Order to Succeed?

In Order to Succeed‘s President and Founder Denise Caron-Quinn talks about the professional organizing firm.

Watch the video:

Further Reading
To learn more about In Order to Succeed visit us at www.inordertosucceed.com
Watch more In Order to Succeed weblogs on the company’s youtube channel.

Week In Review: 8/30

Screen shot 2009-09-24 at 11.03.29 PMHome and Business Organizational news and chatter from around the globe

15 Organizing Tips for a More Orderly Life

denise-quinnAn organized life is a more peaceful life, and having your surroundings in order allows you to enjoy everyday free from stress and clutter. Here are 15 organizing tips from In Order to Succeed to create a more orderly life.

1. Begin the organization process with areas that are most visible and/or problematic. Start small and be sure to allow sufficient time for each step in the process: sort, purge, assign a home, containerize, then maintain and equalize regularly.

2. Create systems that fit your life and surroundings.

3. Keep your systems and procedures as simple as possible.

4. Sort everything by how it is used and keep things close to where you use them.

5. Automate as much as possible – become more familiar with technology to use it to help organize information and pay bills to the extent that you feel comfortable.

6. Learn to say NO, lessen your commitments in accordance with your big picture life goals.

7. Use a master list to keep track of to-dos and projects.

8. Delegate whenever possible and don’t be afraid to ask for help from family, friends and professionals.

9. Purge and weed continuously. Set aside time each day to tidy and maintain your surroundings and schedule.

10. Establish a home for everything and return items to their proper place immediately (or shortly) after use.

11. Use proper containers and tools to more simply organize your environment and schedule.

12. Invest in a good labeler (ie. Brother P-Touch) and label EVERYTHING.

13. Fight procrastination. Make decisions about things when they show up – not blow up!

14. Adopt the habit of letting something go (donate, sell or toss) with every new acquisition and/or purchase.

15. Tell someone about your commitment to the process of getting organized – it will help you stick to your plan and reach your goals.

by: Denise Caron-Quinn
Founder & President of
In Order To Succeed

Manage Your Actions and You’ll Free Your Time

 

Denise Caron-Quinn

by: Denise Caron-Quinn
President & Founder of In Order To Succeed

In a recent Wall Street Journal article we’re told of the development of a new type of drug designed to battle biology. This pharmaceutical agent is growing in popularity for it assists sleep-deprived individuals to remain awake, less groggy and supposedly more productive. The desire for extended periods of rest is being overtaken by a zeal in our society to banish fatigue and maximize our capacity to get more done each day.

Grade school students are introduced to the concept of time management at increasingly younger ages. These youngsters are challenged to plug more activities into their schedules while maintaining high academic performance standards. Whether studies, sports, work related or leisure – these fuller schedules of youths and adults heap on the stress for all of us who attempt to masterfully juggle a wider array of events into each day.

How do we stay on top of all the unfinished work, tasks and projects without being consumed by the anxiety and stress of having so much lingering on our daily to do lists? The answer lies not so much in the concept of how we manage our time but more appropriately how productively we manage our actions.

Getting projects completed on time and maintaining a sense of control over our business and personal affairs requires effective oversight of a variety of actions that are crucial to the success of each task or endeavor. These actions whether done or delegated need to be prioritized, categorized and followed-up to prevent mishaps or crisis from occurring. The idea of working smarter instead of harder is imperative if we wish to reach our goals and still find time to decompress.

It’s been observed that some relatively simple action management strategies can be successfully incorporated into our routines to maximize our achievement of stress-free productivity. Described below are five extremely useful methodologies that can help you regain control of your life and experience a clearer sense of order and achievement.

Using a Master Action List.

Whenever we have an obligation to fulfill or a goal to reach, we remain thoughtful of its presence as long as it remains undone. We’ve all experienced from time to time the sense of stress related to having too much to do and not enough time. This unrelenting bombardment upon our conscious and subconscious thought brings about that sense of discomfort, anxiety or dread as long as the task remains outstanding. This state of mind is unproductive and often unnecessary. The use of a Master List coupled with systematic strategies allows us to more effectively manage actions thus alleviating the apprehension of unfinished business. Often we feel some relief just by committing the action item to the list – even without yet taking any action upon it.

To begin a Master Action List, simply write down or type absolutely everything no matter how small. Develop the list without considering the importance or significance of each item. This will be looked at later. It does not matter whether you create your list using paper or a computerized devise. What is important is that you remove everything out of your head and get it onto your list Write down all things for which you have even the smallest responsibility to change, finish, get involved with, handle or do something about.

Once completed, create sub lists by grouping and consolidating similar actions. Examine how to best subcategorize the items on your list. Some tasks may be associated with certain days of the week or need to be done in a specified location or even with a particular person. Try not to over-categorize but keep the breakdown simple. I prefer to keep my action lists on my Palm Pilot. The categories, which I find useful, are: Errands, Calls, Online actions, Computer work, Agendas (according to project, committee, or partners with whom I’m working), Pending or Awaiting Response (for those activities that have been delegated), to read/research, and Projects. I also maintain categories for my partner, key clients, technological advisor, and assistant. This helps me remain focused upon the work with which they are or will be involved. Upon defining your own personal categories, move each action item onto an appropriate sub-list. This will facilitate reviewing and accomplishing each step.

Examine each list daily or as often as you need to get them off your mind. Now it is recommended to look at your pending tasks giving consideration to their overall importance and due date. Identify the action items that offer the greatest return on investment. Also note those action items that hold the greatest potential to escalate into a crisis situation if ignored. Schedule a time for a comprehensive weekly review of these lists. Reevaluate and reassess for the coming week.

Making the Most of Delays and Short Windows of Time.

 

Expect the unexpected as scheduling set backs are unavoidable. Be prepared to fill in gaps as they arise. Keep on hand reading/ reference material, files/folders, and contact management tools so you can make use small parcels of time making appointments, returning phone calls, or responding to emails. When no work is on hand consider sorting receipts or cleaning out a briefcase or wallet. A considerable impact may be made upon your action management lists by regularly taking small bites. Develop the habit of handling instant tasks (2 minutes or less) as they arise or at the first reasonable opportunity.  You’ll gradually make an impact as you continue taking small bites.

Aim for Success not Perfection.

Any job or project has a point of diminishing returns. Think of time as return on investment. Will the payoff of this task be worth the effort that you’re putting into it? That is the juncture at which additional time or effort spent is not going to significantly affect or enhance the end result. Beware of trying to complete an action step more perfectly than is necessary to satisfy your boss, client or yourself. A job that is done “too” well may require the devotion of time that could be better applied somewhere else.

Backward Scheduling.

 

Determine the time you need to leave the office and that which must be completed before heading home. Schedule your tasks into the day beginning with the time you need to finish. Be sure to overestimate the time that it will take to complete tasks as things always seem to take more time than we expect.  If travel is involved, allow a buffer zone for traffic or subway jams. Include break time for lunch and a snack, as this too will improve your productivity.

Identify and Master Recurrent Timewasters.

Minimizing outside interruptions is a crucial aspect of an effective action management program. The first step is becoming aware of how, why, and when interruptions prevent you from completing work. Then consider ways to deter these common breaks in your schedule. Establish private time during the workday if your business will permit such a practice. Private work time periods should ideally be without instant messaging interruptions or the distraction of pinging notifications of arriving emails.

Callers should either speak to a secretary or be routed into voicemail. Remember to change your greeting during “do not disturb” periods to inform callers that you are in the office but unavailable until a given time. Either forward callers to a suitable designee or advise them how to reach you if they have an emergency requiring your immediate attention. You may wish to appoint staffers as liaisons to regular callers or clients.

The staffer could be titled “account manager” or “personal representative” and empowered to handle all calls of a routine nature – forwarding only problematic matters to you. Return calls all at one time if possible and keep them brief. Plan callbacks when people are less likely to chat – such as before lunch or at the end of the day.

Drop-in visitors are another challenge requiring forethought and finesse. Ask your secretary to protect your interruption-free periods and angel her desk to provide a physical barrier between you and the would-be intruder. If you don’t have secretary, you may choose to reposition your own desk to avoid direct view of those passing by your office, close your door during private work time and put up a sign-notifying visitors when you will be available. If you plan to establish regular interruption-free periods each week then notify staff of this new practice in a memo. When someone does manage to get in front of you while you’re busy with other work, ask if the matter could wait and if so, schedule a time later in the day to address it.

Having worked for many years as a Registered Nurse, I admit to having philosophical conflicts when I think about widespread use of drugs aimed at helping us work harder and for longer periods. No one will dispute the existence of the fast paced, high-pressure environment that surrounds our homes and workplaces. Survival of the fittest still remains a truism and if we are to reach new heights on the productivity fitness scale, we must assimilate effective action management methodologies and strategies into our routines. Successes will be achieved when we find proper balance in the various spheres lives. I’m highly skeptical that any pharmaceutical agent can provide us with this; however, implementing the strategies described above will get us soaring in the right direction.

Manage Your Actions, Free Your Time

 

Denise Caron-QuinnA recent Wall Street Journal Article explains the development of a new type of drug that is growing in popularity. This pharmaceutical agent helps sleep-deprived individuals to remain awake, less groggy and supposedly more productive. The desire for extended periods of rest is being overtaken by a zeal in our society to banish fatigue and maximize our capacity to get more done each day.

Grade school students are introduced to the concept of time management at increasingly younger ages. These youngsters are challenged to plug more activities into their schedules while maintaining high academic performance standards. Whether studies, sports, work related or leisure, these fuller schedules of youths and adults heap on the stress for all of us who attempt to masterfully juggle a wider array of events into each day.

How do we stay on top of all the unfinished work, tasks and projects without being consumed by the anxiety and stress of having so much lingering on our daily to do lists? The answer lies not so much in the concept of how we manage our time but more appropriately how productively we manage our actions.

Getting projects completed on time and maintaining a sense of control over our business and personal affairs requires effective oversight of a variety of actions that are crucial to the success of each task or endeavor. These actions whether done or delegated need to be prioritized, categorized and followed-up to prevent mishaps or crisis from occurring. The idea of working smarter instead of harder is imperative if we wish to reach our goals and still find time to decompress.

Some relatively simple action management strategies can be successfully incorporated into our routines to maximize our achievement of stress-free productivity. Described below are five extremely useful methodologies that can help you regain control of your life and experience a clearer sense of order and achievement.

Using a Master Action List.

Whenever we have an obligation to fulfill or a goal to reach, we remain thoughtful of its presence as long as it remains undone. We’ve all experienced from time to time the sense of stress related to having too much to do and not enough time. This unrelenting bombardment upon our conscious and subconscious thought brings about that sense of discomfort, anxiety or dread as long as the task remains outstanding. This state of mind is unproductive and often unnecessary. The use of a Master List coupled with systematic strategies allows us to more effectively manage actions thus alleviating the apprehension of unfinished business. Often we feel some relief just by committing the action item to the list, even without yet taking any action upon it.

To begin a Master Action List, simply write down or type absolutely everything no matter how small. Develop the list without considering the importance or significance of each item. This will be looked at later. It does not matter whether you create your list using paper or a computerized devise. What is important is that you remove everything out of your head and get it onto your list Write down all things for which you have even the smallest responsibility to change, finish, get involved with, handle or do something about.

Once completed, create sub lists by grouping and consolidating similar actions. Examine how to best subcategorize the items on your list. Some tasks may be associated with certain days of the week or need to be done in a specified location or even with a particular person. Try not to over-categorize but keep the breakdown simple. I prefer to keep my action lists on my Palm Pilot. The categories, which I find useful, are: Errands, Calls, Online actions, Computer work, Agendas (according to project, committee, or partners with whom I am working), Pending or Awaiting Response (for those activities that have been delegated), to read/research, and Projects. I also maintain categories for my partner, key clients, technological advisor, and assistant. This helps me remain focused upon the work with which they are or will be involved. Upon defining your own personal categories, move each action item onto an appropriate sub-list. This will facilitate reviewing and accomplishing each step.

Examine each list daily or as often as you need to get them off your mind. Now it is recommended to look at your pending tasks giving consideration to their overall importance and due date. Identify the action items that offer the greatest return on investment. Also note those action items that hold the greatest potential to escalate into a crisis situation if ignored. Schedule a time for a comprehensive weekly review of these lists. Reevaluate and reassess for the coming week.

Making the Most of Delays and Short Windows of Time.

 

Expect the unexpected as scheduling set backs are unavoidable. Be prepared to fill in gaps as they arise. Keep on hand reading/ reference material, files/folders, and contact management tools so you can make use of small parcels of time by making appointments, returning phone calls, or responding to emails. When no work is on hand consider sorting receipts or cleaning out a briefcase or wallet. A considerable impact may be made upon your action management lists by regularly taking small bites. Develop the habit of handling instant tasks (2 minutes or less) as they arise or at the first reasonable opportunity; you’ll gradually make an impact as you continue taking small bites.

Aim for Success, not Perfection.

Any job or project has a point of diminishing returns. Think of time as return on investment. Will the payoff of this task be worth the effort that you’re putting into it? That is the juncture at which additional time or effort spent is not going to significantly affect or enhance the end result. Beware of trying to complete an action step more perfectly than is necessary to satisfy your boss, client or yourself. A job that is done beyond well may require the devotion of time that could be better applied somewhere else.

Backward Scheduling.

Determine the time you need to leave the office and that which must be completed before heading home. Schedule your tasks into the day beginning with the time you need to finish. Be sure to overestimate the time that it will take to complete tasks as things always seem to take more time than we expect. If travel is involved, allow a buffer zone for traffic or subway jams. Include break time for lunch and a snack, as this too will improve your productivity.

Identify and Master Recurrent Time-wasters.

Minimizing outside interruptions is a crucial aspect of an effective action management program. The first step is becoming aware of how, why, and when interruptions prevent you from completing work. Then consider ways to deter these common breaks in your schedule. Establish private time during the workday if your business will permit such a practice. Private work time periods should ideally be without instant messaging interruptions or the distraction of pinging notifications of arriving emails.

Callers should either speak to a secretary or be routed into voicemail. Remember to change your greeting during do not disturb periods to inform callers that you are in the office but unavailable until a given time. Either forward callers to a suitable designee or advise them how to reach you if they have an emergency requiring your immediate attention. You may wish to appoint staffers as liaisons to regular callers or clients.

The staffer could be titled “account manager” or “personal representative” and empowered to handle all calls of a routine nature and forwarding only problematic matters to you. Return calls all at one time if possible and keep them brief. Plan callbacks when people are less likely to chat – such as before lunch or at the end of the day.

Drop-in visitors are another challenge requiring forethought and finesse. Ask your secretary to protect your interruption-free periods and angel her desk to provide a physical barrier between you and the would-be intruder. If you don’t have secretary, you may choose to reposition your own desk to avoid direct view of those passing by your office, close your door during private work time and put up a sign-notifying visitors when you will be available. If you plan to establish regular interruption-free periods each week then notify staff of this new practice in a memo. When someone does manage to get in front of you while you’re busy with other work, ask if the matter could wait and if so, schedule a time later in the day to address it.

Having worked for many years as a Registered Nurse, I admit to having philosophical conflicts when I think about widespread use of drugs aimed at helping us work harder and for longer periods. No one will dispute the existence of the fast paced, high-pressure environment that surrounds our homes and workplaces. Survival of the fittest still remains a truism and if we are to reach new heights on the productivity fitness scale, we must assimilate effective action management methodologies and strategies into our routines. Successes will be achieved when we find proper balance in the various spheres lives. I am highly skeptical that any pharmaceutical agent can provide us with this; however, implementing the strategies described above will get us soaring in the right direction.

by: Denise Caron-Quinn
President & Founder of In Order To Succeed